Creamy Bites Clinical Information


Adequate calcium and vitamin D as part of a healthy diet, along with physical activity, may reduce the risk of osteoporosis later in life. For most women, calcium supplementation is a necessity, but for many it can mean just another pill that must be taken, often with other medications – a burden easy to skip or forget. That's why we developed Calcet Creamy Bites, a unique and delicious way to promote good bone health and help in the fight against osteoporosis.


  • Creamy Bites contain calcium citrate – the most readily absorbed1 and trusted form of calcium, without the gas production associated with calcium carbonate.2
  • Each small, delicious piece delivers 500 mg of calcium, and 400 IU of vitamin D3 – just 2 servings each day can provide the total Recommended Dietary Allowances for both.3
  • In clinical studies, biochemical markers for bone resorption significantly decreased in patients taking calcium citrate.4
  • In studies involving postmenopausal women, calcium citrate significantly decreased serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and urinary hydroxyproline, a biochemical marker of bone resorption.5
  • The excellent solubility of calcium citrate makes it a good choice for patients with achlorhydria or hypochlorhydria, which can result from the use of H2 antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, or over-the-counter antacids.6
  • Calcet Creamy Bites can be taken anytime, anywhere – with their delicious, dessert-like quality, people can actually look forward to taking their calcium each day.

Calcium supplementation is serious. Calcet Creamy Bites are seriously enjoyable.


  • The benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplementation continue to emerge in the medical and scientific literature – Creamy Bites deliver all these benefits.
  • People take Creamy Bites because it's the delicious and fun way to get their full day's supply of calcium and vitamin D.

 

Order Calcet Creamy Bites online today!


References:
  1. Sakhaee K, Bhuket T, Adams-Huet B, et al. Meta-analysis of calcium bioavailability: a comparison of calcium citrate with calcium carbonate. Am J Ther. 1999;6:313-321.
  2. Peck B. Calcium bioavailability. Am J Ther. 1999;6:323-324.
  3. Ross AC, Manson JE, et al. The 2011 Report on Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D from the Institute of Medicine: What Clinicians Need to Know. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011;96(1):53-58.
  4. Kenny AM, Prestwood KM, Biskup B, et al. Comparison of the effects of calcium loading with calcium citrate or calcium carbonate on bone turnover in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis Int. 2004;15(4):290-294.
  5. Zerwekh JE, Padalino P, Pak CYC. The effect of intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride and continuous calcium citrate therapy on calcitropic hormones, biochemical markers of bone metabolism, and blood chemistry in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Calcif Tissue Int. 1997;61:272-278.
  6. Pak CYC, Poindexter J, Finlayson B. A model system for assessing physicochemical factors affecting calcium absorbability from the intestinal tract. J Bone Miner Res. 1989;4:119-127.